Nootropic Stack of the 2nd Smartest Person in the World

25 May 2016
Lincoln Cannon

Nootropic Stack of Rick Rosner the 2nd Smartest Person in the World

With an IQ of 192, Rick Rosner may be the second smartest person in the world. And he uses about 50 drugs, dietary supplements, and foods each day to make his brain and body work better. I've reviewed the dietary supplements (not the drugs or foods) that he's using. It looks like about 17 of them have evidence for nootropic effect. Below is a table that summarizes what I found, followed by some observations.

This information is for educational purposes only. It is not medical advice. Please consult a physician before and during use of these and other nootropics.

The "nootropic" column lists the dietary supplements that Rick uses, whether or not they may qualify as nootropics based on evidence and effect. The "evidence" column shows the Examine.com score for the level of evidence on a scale of 0 to 4 for the nootropic effect with the strongest supporting evidence (there may be non-nootropic effects with higher levels of evidence). The "effect" column shows the Examine.com score for the magnitude of effect on a scale of 0 to 3 for the effect with the strongest supporting evidence (again, there may be non-nootropic effects with higher magnitudes of effect).

Nootropic Evidence Effect
Acetylcysteine 0 0
Ashwagandha 3 2
aGPC 2 2
Astragalus 2 1
Benfotiamine 0 0
Blueberry 2 1
Bromelain 1 1
Calcium 0 0
Caffeine 3 2
Carnitine 3 1
Carnosine 0 0
Chondroitin
0 0
Curcumin 2 1
DMAE 0 0
Fish Oil 4 2
Gastrodin 0 0
Glisodin 0 0
Glucosamine 0 0
Grape Seed 0 0
Horse Chestnut 0 0
Lycopene 0 0
Phosphatidylserine 3 1
Piracetam 4 2
Pregnenolone 0 0
Quercetin 0 0
Rosmarinic Acid 0 0
SAMe 2 2
Selenium 0 0
Trimethylglycine 2 1
Uridine 1 1
Vinpocetine 2 1
Vitamin C 2 1
Vitamin D 1 0
Vitamin E 2 2
Vitamin K 0 0

Average Evidence: 1.2 (equivalent of "uncontrolled or observational studies only")

Average Effect: 0.7 (equivalent of "minor")

A few of these dietary supplements may provide notable nootropic effects, based on multiple peer-reviewed, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. They include Ashwagandha to decrease anxiety, Fish Oil to decrease depression, and Piracetam to decrease cognitive decline. The first two are in my list of real smart drugs, or first tier nootropics. FDA does not allow vendors to market Piracetam as a dietary supplement in the United States, but it is a legal substance that appears to have a low risk of side effects.

Some of the dietary supplements in the list may provide subtle nootropic effects, based on multiple peer-reviewed, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies; or notable effects, based on one double-blind or multiple cohort studies. They include aGPC to decrease cognitive decline, Caffeine to increase wakefulness, Carnitine to decrease fatigue, Phosphatidylserine to increase cognition, and SAMe to decrease depression. I think of these as second tier nootropics. They may not be as dependable or effective as the first tier nootropics mentioned above, but they may still provide value.

Some other dietary supplements in the list, although perhaps not dependable or effective directly as nootropics, may provide other notable health effects, according to multiple peer-reviewed, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. They include Blueberry to decrease DNA damage, Curcumin to decrease inflammation and pain, Horse Chestnut to decrease chronic venous insufficiency and leg swelling, Vitamin D to decrease risk of falls and colorectal cancer risk, and Vitamin K to increase bone mineral density.

Personally, I probably wouldn't take the other dietary supplements in the list at this time for a few reasons. First, some appear not to have been well studied. Second, some appear to have been well studied but do not appear to provide reliable nootropic or other health benefits. And third, some appear to have been well studied and to provide reliable nootropic or other health benefits in some cases, but those cases are not relevant to most people.

I won't comment on most of the drugs in Rick's list, but I will comment on one. Be careful with DHT blockers like Avodart! They may be anti-nootropic. Unfortunately, I know this from personal experience using Propecia (Finasteride). It's a prescription DHT blocker that I used for several years to treat hair loss. It worked for that, but it also increased anxiety and "brain fog". And there may be evidence that DHT blockers can increase depression.

Finally, Rick and others, you might talk with your physician about adding a few other top tier nootropics to this stack. Consider Bacopa to increase memory, Creatine to decrease fatigue, Ginkgo to decrease cognitive decline, Inositol to decrease anxiety, Melatonin to decrease insomnia, Rhodiola to increase cognition, Theanine to increase relaxation, and Zinc to decrease depression. For more information about these nootropics, take a look at my list of real smart drugs. And for a single product that combines several of these top tier nootropics, take a look at Clarity.

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Increase Your Memory with Bacopa Monnieri

Increase Your Memory with Bacopa Monnieri

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