Cognivex Clarity Is NOT the Real Clarity

11 August 2018
Lincoln Cannon

Fingers Crossed

Simply put, it's a scam. Cognivex Clarity brain enhancement formula may even be a hoax. Unfortunately, many consumers have confused our product, Thrivous Clarity, with one of several variations of Cognivex Clarity — which appears also to use the labels "CortyX Clarity," "Clarity X," and "Apollo Mental Clarity." This presents risk to the Thrivous brand, associating it with the poor business practices of a shady company (or network). And the problem is getting worse.

A few weeks ago, I published a warning about the CortyX Clarity variation of their product. At the time, there seems to have been a major advertising push for that variation. Google searches for it were skyrocketing. Then at about the time that my warning went live, perhaps only coincidentally or maybe consequently, the searches evaporated.

But that wasn't the end. While the searches for one variation declined, searches for the Cognivex Clarity variation began to increase rapidly. And now, a few weeks later, searches for the new variation are taking off. Another major advertising push has probably begun. Check out this chart from Google Trends, which shows CortyX Clarity searches (in blue) being replaced by Cognivex Clarity searches (in red).

Google Trends for CortyX Clarity and Cognivex Clarity

Is Cognivex Clarity for Sale?

Strangely, despite the advertising push, it's not easy to figure out how to buy Cognivex Clarity. When searching for the product via Google, I got one Cognivex review after another, consisting mostly of negative verdicts from real reviewers and positive verdicts from the dark hordes of fake supplement review websites (another topic for another time).

What I didn't get was a website directly offering to sell Cognivex Clarity. But among the search results there were at least a couple websites that promote the product and provide links that purport to take you to an online store. Here's a picture of one of them:

cognivex.net

What happens if you click on that "Rush My Trial" button? Well, It takes you to a website that sells IntelligenceRx Cognitive Support. Here's a picture:

tryintelligence.com

On the IntelligenceRx website, I found no mention of Cognivex Clarity at all. And when I submitted order info, the website returned an error message. So, at first, that made me wonder if Cognivex is just a fictional product that someone is using to generate sales leads for other products.

However, just this morning I received (yet another) phone call from a confused person who had received an unwanted bottle of Cognivex Clarity in the mail and asked to stop it. The person actually had a bottle in hand. And I know this because I asked her to read information from it to me. She even described the Cognivex logo on the bottle. So based on that, I imagined that someone must be at least selling the product via telephone, perhaps sharing the Cognivex phone number in TV or radio ads that people can't easily find later.

When I saw the Cognivex promotional website, it was immediately familiar. That's because it uses the same template as one of the websites that promotes CortyX Clarity. And they both include pictures of the same fake reviewers that I mentioned in my review of CortyX. Here's a picture:

cortyxclarity.org

I also recognized the IntelligenceRx sales website. It uses the same template as an old version of the CortyX Clarity sales website. And it probably won't come as a surprise that both websites use similar manipulative sales tactics -- so hurry, because they're almost out of stock, like they have been and will be every day. Here's a picture:

cortyxbrainbooster.com v2

As you can see from the pictures, the Cognivex Clarity, CortyX Clarity, and IntelligenceRx websites are strikingly similar in design and message. It's probable that they were planned and implemented by the same persons or teams, or at least by a network of persons and teams that share strategies and templates.

As it turns out, their relationship with each other is not flattering for any of them. In my review of CortyX Clarity, I already pointed out the poor reputation of the businesses that appear to be behind the brand. And although this new Cognivex Clarity label hasn't been around as long, it has also already begun to generate a negative reputation. For example, the Better Business Bureau (BBB) opened a file on Cognivex Booster in July and gave the company an "F" rating.

That's where I found the last clue I needed to figure out the location of the main Cognivex website. The BBB file includes an address of 5710 Ogeechee Rd, Suite 200-215, Savannah GA 31405. I searched Google for that address and found a website that listed the Cognivex Clarity phone number as 888 906 1190 and the email address as support@cognivexbooster.com. And guess what happens if you go to cognivexbooster.com?

Yes. Although it's hard to find (which seems to undermine the efficacy of their new advertising push), Cognivex Clarity is for sale online -- at least, it would be if the website worked, which it did not for me. Here's a picture of their online store:

cognivexbooster.com

Look familiar? If you've visited the CortyX Clarity website before, it might. As I mentioned above, there's more than one version of the CortyX website. Here's another version, which is (not surprisingly at this point) strikingly similar to the Cognivex website:

cortyxbrainbooster.com v1

Cognivex Clarity Is NOT the Clarity You Want

You're probably already convinced that Cognivex Clarity is NOT the Clarity you want. But I'll rehearse the reasons. They'll be familiar to anyone who read my review of CortyX Clarity. I'll summarize them in 6 points.

First, Cognivex uses manipulative marketing tactics. For example, there are count-down timers that endlessly reset. There are logos of news websites that almost certainly have never mentioned the product in any flattering way. And there are wildly exaggerated benefit claims (such as "instant super computer mental ability").

Second, the Cognivex Clarity supplement facts aren't easy to find. They don't appear to be available on the Internet, let alone on the Cognivex website. No one should buy a supplement that makes it hard to find the supplement facts, which are required by the FDA. But I wager, even if we could find the supplement facts, that they would claim a proprietary blend that hides the doses of whatever ingredients Cognivex might claim. After all, that's what CortyX does. And I also wager that the ingredients would be dosed at ineffective levels, again like CortyX ingredients. But unfortunately I can't confirm any of this because Cognivex makes this information hard to find -- or altogether hides it.

Third, there's no apparent way to know whether and how Cognivex is testing the quality of its product. We don't know the Cognivex Clarity ingredients. And we don't even know that Cognivex knows the ingredients. Who are their suppliers? Did they run tests to confirm the claims of their suppliers? Do they have any evidence that we should trust the identity or potency of their ingredient claims? What about any reason to trust that they have tested for microbes or heavy metals? I don't know. And nothing on their website helps me know. So I wouldn't put Cognivex Clarity pills in my mouth.

Fourth, the product reviews for Cognivex Clarity are almost certainly fake. They use the same pictures and the same text that appear in the testimonial section of a CortyX Clarity website, as well as a number of other shady brain supplement websites. I'm pretty sure neither John D nor Jane M has ever tried Cognivex Clarity. But even if they have, I wouldn't trust either of them any more than I trust any of the many scams they're trying to push on me.

Fake Reviews for Cognivex Clarity

Fake Reviews for CortyX Clarity

Fifth, Cognivex may be obfuscating a track record of poor business practices. There's a striking resemblance between the strategy and presentation of Cognivex and CortyX. Somehow these brands are related. They're either the same company, or they're working together, or one is ripping off the other. None of those cases is flattering. If they're the same company or working together then all the negative BBB reviews associated with CortyX (as mentioned in my other article) would be relevant. And if Cognivex is ripping off CortyX then why should we trust them not to rip us off? Either way, it looks bad.

Sixth, the Cognivex Clarity price is a total rip off. Although I couldn't find a way to make the online store work, I did find the product price on their "Terms and Conditions" webpage. It explains that their "trial" isn't free. They immediately charge $5.94 for shipping the trial product. Then they charge $84 for the trial product if the customer hasn't canceled within 14 days. At that time, they also enroll the customer in a product subscription that renews each 45 days for $89.94. Are the 30 pills in a Cognivex Clarity bottle likely to be worth anything close to $3 each? Not for anyone I know. It's an extraordinarily high price, and it's charged in a far-less-than-transparent way. So far as I'm concerned, that's the definition of a scam.

Thrivous Clarity IS the Clarity You Want

Compare all of that with Thrivous Clarity. We charge only $21 per bottle of 60 capsules ($28 without a subscription). That's as low as 35 cents per capsule. Each serving of 2 capsules contains nutrients and doses that have demonstrated nootropic efficacy in multiple peer-reviewed, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical studies on humans. Both the nutrients and the doses are fully disclosed in our supplement facts, which are prominently displayed on our website. All of our supplier, manufacturing, and third-party quality control test results are also shared prominently from the product webpage. And the studies on which our formula is based are also shared prominently from the product webpage. To top things off, the BBB currently gives Thrivous an "A" rating.

You probably found your way here because you're looking for Clarity. Don't be fooled by the fakes. Thrivous is the Clarity you want.

Buy Thrivous Clarity Daily Nootropic

Pulse 76: 3D Molecular Engineering for Cancer Immunotherapy

Pulse 76: 3D Molecular Engineering for Cancer Immunotherapy

Will Nootropics Become “Illegal” in eSports?

Will Nootropics Become “Illegal” in eSports?